Five Reasons Why Your Business Does Not Need A Blog

I’ve been writing blog posts for nearly a decade, and it is safe to say I have composed more than my share. In fact, I am dangerously over-exposed to blogs, social media and industry advice coming from every direction. Which may explain the bitter taste left in mouth by the steady stream of of experts and pontificators who suggest over and over again that small- to medium-sized businesses must find time to blog.

I could point to any number or prominent violators busily spinning their webs of opinion and deceit. Of course, the content evangelists don’t see what they’re doing as problematic in the least. Quite the contrary, the soapbox toppers of our day are doing us all a service, heckling us about the need to blog, and to share every update or fragment of a thought in social channels.

What the hell, it’s free advice. We are free to take it or leave it. Here, let me contribute one more float to the ego parade, but may it please be the anti-float (like the one in Animal House).

    Five Reasons Why Your Business Does Not Need A Blog

    1) Your prospects and customers don’t read blogs or much else on a screen.

    2) There’s not enough return on investment to justify the cost.

    3) Every company is NOT a media company. Many successful companies make widgets or muffins or whatever and create no media at all.

    4) Your “blogging voice” has an incurable case of blogarrhea and can’t stop itself from talking incessantly about the company’s great products, service and so on. Booooring.

    5) You never signed up to be a thought leader, and just want to be the best chimney sweep, pizza maker, social worker or writer of ads you can be.

Would Frank Lloyd Wright bother to write a blog post in order to further enhance his architecture brand? No. He’d simply show you the blueprints or better yet a model of the building he envisions for you. Show, don’t tell. Yet, here we are falling all over ourselves to tell it like it is.

The blogging garden is wildly overgrown. The weeds are hardly discernible from the fruits. And this clutter violates a fundamental law of marcom. In order to communicate brand value, it’s necessary to strip away all the excess around a brand. That’s the beauty of an ad — it’s compact, and can only carry one message comfortably. If you consistently bring clarity and order to your blogging, bless you. If you go on and on and in an inelegant manner, it’s time to confiscate your noise maker.

3 Comments

  1. I read your post and agree – blogging definitely is not for everyone. But I’d suggest the title of your post isn’t accurate – those aren’t really reasons not to blog so much as reasons why a blog isn’t succeeding. But let’s take them one by one:

    1. Prospects and customers don’t read blogs or much else on a screen. Counter-opinion: As the HubSpot ebook noted, sites with strong blogs enjoy 55% more traffic, greater duration of time on site, pages viewed, etc. People read GOOD (e.g. useful, informative, helpful) content. It’s the whole reason they’re out there searching.

    2) There’s not enough return on investment to justify the cost. Counter-opinion: As the ROI on direct marketing declines, content marketing strategies like blogging are taking their place. Good blogs are a great investment if they’re managed strategically.

    3) Every company is NOT a media company. Many successful companies make widgets or muffins or whatever and create no media at all. Counter-opinion: Obviously most companies aren’t media companies. But they need to MARKET those widgets. The website is the face of the modern organization – static content will only take you so far both with search engines and visitors.

    4) Your “blogging voice” has an incurable case of blogarrhea and can’t stop itself from talking incessantly about the company’s great products, service and so on. Booooring. Counter-opinion: Again, this is a reason why your blog is failing, not why you don’t need a blog. No company needs a crappy blog. So improve it.

    5) You never signed up to be a thought leader, and just want to be the best chimney sweep, pizza maker, social worker or writer of ads you can be. Counter-opinion: You don’t have to be a thought leader to write about your industry. I have had clients in construction, in engineering, and other supposedly ‘dull’ industries write/share fascinating insights into what they do with the added benefit that content made them more visible and of interest to prospects, partners, etc.

  2. David Burn says:

    Thank you for reading and for the point-by-point comment, Doug. I am glad to hear you agree that blogging is not for everyone or for every business.

    My headline is not a bulls eye, I give you that, but look at that SEO at work! It’s a marvel of modern times!

    Really, I am making just two points above. One is for business owners fretting over how, or whether, to tell their stories and the other point is a word of caution about the advise industry of which Marketing Profs and Bonehook is a part.

    BTW, I write articles for clients all the time, and I write them here on Bonehook.com to build the Bonehook brand. I believe in good content as much, probably more, than the next guy, I just get tired of the constant call for it, in a broad sense because most companies are ill equipped to do it right.

    And for the companies who are ready and willing to do it right, there’s still the need to temper enthusiasm. Content marketing is a brand building exercise that provides benefits to the brand over the long haul. I think this point gets overlooked sometimes in the rush to “join the movement” and “produce measurable results.”

  3. David Burn says:

    As I mention in the article above, there are so many people on blogging’s side. Just this morning I learned from NameTagScott that blogging works because it drips.

    “Blogs work because they drip. It’s the continuum of output that has volume and gravity and narrative, all of which will carry your name to a wider pool.”

    Perhaps this true, and you can develop an audience for your writing. I’ve done it. But what I learned is readers are not always customers, and therein lies the problem. Companies need customers, not readers.

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