Monthly Archive: August 2017

Does Your Company Have a Giving Strategy?

I’ve always admired companies with a solid track record of philanthropy and corporate responsibility, and I am honored to announce that Bonehook is now an official member of 1% For the Planet.

1% for the Planet is a network of more than 1,200 member businesses, numerous individuals, and thousands of nonprofit partners in more than 40 countries. Members have given more than $150 million to environmental nonprofits to date.

As a new member, Bonehook will now share one percent of the capital we earn, as well as in-kind work and volunteer hours – to further causes that we believe in. We’ve chosen Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) to be the recipient of our giving in 2017.

(ONDA) exists to protect, defend and restore Oregon’s high desert for current and future generations. Our dream is to see millions of acres of beautiful and ecologically vital public lands permanently protected and home to diverse populations of wildlife. Working in partnership with more than 10,000 members and supporters, ONDA is the only group dedicated exclusively to the preservation of Oregon’s high desert public lands.

1% For the Planet ‘s co-founder, Yvon Chouinard, has long been a hero to us, and his business philosophy – found in his book Let My People Go Surfing – provides us a solid compass as business owners. The philosophy is one born out of respect, people over profits, and doing the best work in your field. An ethos that pushes the boundaries and requires us to remain focused on the journey more than the destination.

For Bonehook, this speaks to our foundational career beginnings. David began his career in Washington, DC, working on the Hill for American Rivers. I have always been an environmental activist, initially with Ohio Citizen Action as a young adult, and later with the Living Future Institute here in Portland. As a key member of the team that helped usher in Living Building Challenge – the most stringent green building standard in the world – I understand the incredible challenges non-profits face and have some ideas about how to help alleviate some of their funding and organizational pressures.

We know what it takes to sustain a person and an organization working in the overburdened, underfunded world of saving the planet. Thank you to those of you who carry that torch every single day. We stand in solidarity with you, and will do our best to support you with our time and money. By working together and by encouraging the people and companies in our immediate universe to think and act consciously, we hope to be a small part of some big changes.

Find Time To Focus (Your Customers Are Counting On It)

How much time do you spend each week thinking through your business problems?

Many mangers can’t find the time, and that’s a problem.

“If you ask managers in a large organization to approach a strategic business problem, their focus often quickly narrows to proposing solutions. When asked why, many respond that they don’t have time to think.” -Duncan Simester, MIT Sloan School of Management

Not having time to think sounds a lot like not having time to breathe. You drown in the details.

In related news, I recently downloaded “Rethink the B2B Buyer’s Journey,” a new ebook from LinkedIn. Inside the report, I found this revealing graph:

The most effective salespeople, and the most successful companies, consistently make their customers smarter and give them an edge on their competition. The only way to provide this level of insight is to truly know and care about the client’s business, and the only way to do that is to make time to think.

The Question Remains…

How do you make your customers smarter, while also making your quarterly numbers, and helping them make theirs?

According to Bright Funnel, the average path to sale for high growth tech companies is 512 days from lead to revenue.

When you have quarterly numbers to meet, 512 days from lead to revenue is an eternity. Click To Tweet

There may be little one can do to relieve the pressure or pace of sales targeting at your company. What one can do is always bring new business-building ideas to prospects and customers. Little gifts go a long way. Clearly, there can be a danger in overwhelming people with too much information. Likewise, there’s a danger in failing to reveal your thinking.

Despite what we’ve heard before, coffee is not for closers. To rise above the noise, it takes skill, patience, and unbelievable persistence. It also requires that you care about the customer. Caring means you’re not always closing, you’re always considering (on your customer’s behalf).