Monthly Archive: June 2017

Are You Feeding 5-Course Dinners To People Hungry For Snacks?

It’s not every day that I come across a mind-blowing marketing communications statistic. I found one on Kiss Metrics’ site this week that I must share with you.

Approximately 96% of visitors that come to your website are not ready to buy.

While stats can be easily manipulated, and percentages will move up or down based on the company in question, the point here is mind-numbingly clear: People are window shopping online.

The computer or phone screen is the same glass barrier that we see in a traditional retailer’s windows to the street. And the online and physical retailer’s tasks are also identical: Interest a small percentage of the passersby to come inside the store, touch the product, and hear from the sales associate as to the various attributes.

Whether you sell services or products, online or off, the idea is basically the same. Move people from “not interested” to “interested,” and then direct them down a sales funnel. The problem with this linear approach to customer acquisition is people don’t naturally line up like cattle. People are free to wander around, shop the competition, read some reviews, talk to a friend or colleague, and maybe one lucky day “pinball” back to you and your company’s highly appealing and perfectly packaged offers.

Here’s a fair question: Why do marketers insist on using a formula from the late 19th century in today’s media-rich marketplace?

I think we all enjoy an easy to visualize framework that supports our desire to convert shoppers into customers. Dealing with the reality of a customer’s pinballing her way through her own individualized customer journey—rather than opting for a smooth glide down a provided slide—is the first big step to reconfiguring our thinking around the role of a company’s website.

If 96% of the visitors to your website are not ready to buy, what are they ready for? Are they ready to learn? Presumably, yes, that’s why they bothered to stop their clicking for a minute or two and consider your offers. Since a minute or two is about all that someone is willing to give at first, it’s important to put “content snacking” at the heart of your digital strategy.

Ask yourself this: Is your company’s website offering visitors what they actually want, versus what you think they want? We often assume that visitors to our website want more information on our products or services. When you run a pizza joint, it’s a good assumption. When you run a software as a service (SaaS) company, or a marketing services provider like Bonehook, the customer’s journey is much more layered, nuanced, and lengthy.

Approximately 96% of visitors that come to your website are not ready to buy. Click To Tweet

To move people toward your company’s larger offers, we suggest a steady routine of content snacking as a prelude to richer meals like white papers or case studies. There is a reason to deploy landing pages and A-B testing of multiple offers, but once again let’s confront the boogeyman in the room. We too often assume that people are ready for a deep dive into our materials, but that’s more wishful thinking in many cases.

A blog post that’s 800 words or less is a content snack. Social media updates are content snacks. When used successfully, a trail of snacks will lead people to want a complete meal from you. Thus, a successful website will be front-loaded with content snacks and back-loaded with content meals.

If you’d like Bonehook’s help assessing your website’s proper content balance, send us a note and we’ll arrange a Walk and Talk.

Client Showcase #25

Earlier this year Portland-based design consultancy, XPLANE, hired Bonehook to help strengthen the firm’s copy muscles.

We were flattered by the request and also impressed by it. Think how much better all marketing communications would be if more of us bothered to ask our peers for their explicit opinions and expert help?

XPLANE, of course, has a keen interest in creating clear and compelling content.

For the past 24 years, XPLANE has accelerated business transformation initiatives by visualizing, clarifying, and explaining complex technologies, strategies, processes, and solutions.

One way that XPLANE delivers insights is via their Xplanations—the visual assets that result from a series of workshop sessions led by the XPLANE team. The outputs are co-created infographics that XPLANE’s clients then use to share their workshop discoveries with other stakeholders.

Bonehook’s role right now is working directly with teams at XPLANE to provide feedback on developing work. We’re also starting to help describe and promote the company’s various service offerings.

Next month, we will be conducting a two-hour workshop for the XPLANE team. Working title: Fundamentals of Copywriting for Non-Copywriters.